All posts by claireseldon

New to EduTweetOz, here is Kylie Youkhana

Please tell us a little about your background in education. Why did you decide to become involved in education? What are some of the roles you’ve had and what does your current role involve?
kylie

I am a mature-age, early career teacher. I graduated from Macquarie University in 2014 with a Bachelor of Education (Birth – 12). I did not get a UAI in high school and therefore I did not even apply to go to university. I thought that the doors to higher education were shut so I worked in administration and was in the role of an Office Manager. I always felt like something was missing, I could do my job, and do it well, but it wasn’t fulfilling. I decided to look into TAFE courses and met with a TAFE counselor who had me complete an aptitude test, the test showed my areas of strength and highlighted teaching as a career that would suit. From there I discovered that I was able to get into university via alternative pathways. I completed a STAT test and was accepted into a B.Ed degree at Macquarie University, while completing my degree I worked at a temp agency for child care and then as a nanny for an amazing family. Upon finishing my degree I worked as a Casual Relief Teacher and then secured consistent work from my current school. With my current school I have worked in a variety of roles, New Arrivals, LaST, EaLD, RFF and Classroom Teacher. For the last two years I have been a Stage 3 teacher on a 5/6 Composite Class. I have also lead the choir, coached the PSSA team, as well as being part of our school STEM Action Team. I am currently coordinating our community of schools’ performing arts festival. I am a self professed techie and love sharing my knowledge, skills and passion for integrating ICT with my colleagues.

Who or what keeps you inspired and motivated in your work?

Of course I love the lightbulb moments, but the ultimate reward for my work that keeps me motivated is watching a student learn to love learning. I love seeing the student who thinks that they can’t, all of a sudden realise that they can. I love knowing that every day will be different and that for some kids I am the difference in their day.

What do you see as some of the biggest rewards and challenges for people working in education today?

Biggest rewards: Working with inspired people (colleagues and executives) and inspiring our students.
Biggest Challenges: The gaps…. Gaps in preparation from university for real teaching practice, gaps in communication from the top down, gaps in knowledge and understanding among all students.

If you had the ability to make changes to the education system in Australia, what would you do?

I would put key decision makers into classrooms so that they get first hand experience at what life is truly like. I would reform standardised testing and make it more relevant and accessible for students. I would reduce the administrative burden on teachers. Am I going too far?

What role do you see EduTweetOz playing on the education scene in Australia and what are your hopes for the account this week?
EduTweetOz brings us all together, it gives us a place to share our thoughts and to challenge our perceptions. It is a place where our voices become one, and one collective voice can be powerful.

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Welcoming Nicole Kapernick

Hi everyone. I’m the daughter of two primary school teachers but education has been valued in my family going back some generations. I dreamt of being a journalist rather than a teacher but when I completed my degree in Drama I needed to work, and teaching was the obvious option for me. I loved school as a student. I had many excellent teachers who mentored me, and I wanted to be ‘one of those’ teachers in the system – the teacher that made school a place you wanted to be.

nicolekapernick

I’ve had three stages in my career thus far – optimistic, idealistic, young drama teacher; mother of three trying to earn some money and stage her return to the profession and now- older, wiser, still idealistic but more reasoned teacher of English working full time for the first time in some 13 years.

Along the way I’ve worked in a range of Catholic schools from Lismore to the inner suburbs of Brisbane – co-educational, all boys and all girls. I’ve not had any senior roles but have mentored practicum or student teachers and always had a pastoral role as homeroom teacher.

My students are primarily what keep me motivated in my work. A long time ago a wise teacher told me that “being a parent makes you a  better teacher and being a teacher makes you a better parent”. As a parent I see the flip side of the classroom at home and the impact teachers have on young learners. I am always motivated to be the teacher students go home and talk to their parents about for the ‘right’ reasons. I’ve met and worked with quite a few inspiriting colleagues over the years and I try to integrate a little bit of their educational DNA into my approach to teaching.

The rewards in education are obvious to me – I get joy out of seeing my students succeed, I feel privileged to be part of their lives and to play a small part in getting them where they need to go and I’m guaranteed to learn one thing and laugh at least once every single day. The challenges can be overwhelming. I genuinely worry for the younger teachers I see new to the profession and wonder how long they will survive in our systems. At times I resent the public perception of my profession and their criticism of our effectiveness, amongst friends and politicians alike.
I think the greatest challenge is to have the courage to do less. It’s a challenge to say “No. Enough. Trust me. We don’t need to do that just now.”

If I could change the Education system in Australia I would dearly love to make it far more egalitarian. A free, well resourced, engaging education is the golden ticket for our young people and if all of them genuinely had this opportunity, our community would be immensely richer for it.

I follow @EduTweetOz because it is a strong community of amazing professionals who genuinely seem to love being educators and want to collaborate to make our profession stronger. I look forward to the insights that others will share with me this week and to shamelessly stealing any resources that are posted in good faith.

Excited to introduce Helen Georgiou

1. Please tell us a little about your background in education. Why did you decide to become involved in education? What are some of the roles you’ve had and what does your current role involve?
My involvementhelenG in education was a happy accident. Being ‘first in family’, I had no familiarity with professional (or academic) careers or university so after completing a combined Bachelor of Science and Commerce at The University of Sydney a year earlier than required, I completed a Diploma of Education at UNSW. I loved science and wanted to travel, so this seemed to make sense to me. I taught in Sydney and then London as a high school physics teacher and returned to do Honours a few years later. I didn’t intend for it to be in education or to go on to do my PhD but my experience was so positive and I ultimately felt that this is probably the role that I can contribute the most in (I didn’t see myself as a school leader and also didn’t think I could teach high school science forever). My PhD research involved looking at the way people make sense of physics, and how instructors can help this along. I am now a lecturer in science education at the University of Wollongong (and honorary lecturer in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney). I mainly teach pre-service primary and secondary teachers. My research focuses on the teaching and learning of science.

2. Who or what keeps you inspired and motivated in your work?
My work is inspiring at so many levels; from the everyday things like being able to run fun demonstrations and experiments with students in the tutorials (fire! robots!) to working on big projects which try to solve tricky problems. It is hard work but I don’t think a day goes by that I don’t love what I get to do.

3. What do you see as some of the biggest rewards and challenges for people working in education today?

I think anyone in education would be aware of the rewards; you are a part of something bigger than yourself, you get to contribute to the development of learners and for discipline educators like myself, you get to understand and appreciate your discipline in an entirely different way.
I feel like the biggest challenge for people working in education include the (sometimes very ridiculous) expectations placed on them, ignorance around the complexity of teaching and learning (which means aspects of education are devalued) and the politicisation of elements of curriculum and pedagogy.
4. If you had the ability to make changes to the education system in Australia, what would you do?
I think the education system in Australia is pretty good as is!
Having worked in different sectors and countries though, I did encounter some things that I thought were really positive. For example, I felt much more supported and part of a ‘network’ when I worked in London; they had a smaller bureaucratic unit (the local Borough, or ‘council’), so collaboration and professional development was much better managed and they had ‘programs’ for beginning teachers (they even had names- NQTs, Newly Qualified Teachers). This model also helped focus on local needs (here, it’s either the State or the School… too big and too small in my opinion). It just seemed like this approach helped make the education community more connected.
Also, obviously being in science education, I think that there is definitely not enough being done to address these issues.

5. What role do you see EduTweetOz playing on the education scene in Australia and what are your hopes for the account this week?
I can’t stress how important it is to have professional communities such as EduTweetOz around. Personally, being a part of a wider discussion, whether it’s a local research group or international research community, is the most important part of what I do. We need to keep talking and listening to each other to make progress (and to avoid repeating mistakes!)

I hope that I can provide some insight into science, education, and what I do as an academic. More importantly, I would just love to connect with members of the EduTweetOz community. Make sure you reach out!

UOW profile: https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/helen_georgiou (some papers publicly available)
Usyd profile: http://sydney.edu.au/science/physics/about/profiles/heleng-2016.shtml

Please meet Vince Wall.

Why did you decide to become involved in education? What are some of the roles you’ve had and what does your current role involve?

Hi. I’m Vince. My Twitter handle references an email from a 12-year-old student some years ago at school who addressed me as “Mr Vince”. (She signed off with “Love”. 😊 This was greeted with much mirth by my colleagues!)VinceWall

I honestly have no idea anymore why a very young, naïve, and reasonably sheltered 17-year-old me decided to become a teacher. Perhaps I became a teacher because of family connections and because I was familiar with it as an occupation. I do certainly remember that, in my final year of high school, teaching was the only thing I wanted to do. I haven’t been disappointed with my choice.

I’ve been teaching secondary students in the humanities subjects since January 1988. I genuinely love teaching. I have every intention of sticking with teaching for perhaps another decade or two.

In my time as a teacher I’ve held various roles and seemed to have adopted a pattern of opting to become “downwardly mobile” every 8 – 10 years. Working with kids inspires and invigorates me. Teaching, despite its challenges, brings me a lot of joy in my life.

In my time teaching I have taught in the state, Catholic and independent sectors – and enjoyed them all. I have learnt from so many wonderful colleagues in so many contexts. I have also taught as a part-time sessional lecturer in teacher education. I have taught in all boys’ schools, co-ed schools, and currently teach in an all girls’ Catholic independent school. My entire teaching career has been in and around Brisbane / South-East Queensland, but I have had the opportunity to travel from time to time. My students have included lower socio-economic students and quite affluent students. I’ve taught vocational education students and taught some highly academically driven students.

I am currently a full-time classroom teacher but have spent a substantial amount of my career in middle leadership roles as a head of curriculum or as a pastoral / student welfare middle leader (such as Year Level Coordinator or Head of House). In 2017, I decided to step away from middle leadership as a Head of House of 9 years. In my 30 years of teaching, the majority have been in roles connected to student welfare. In most recent times, this has meant working with students with significant well-being needs.

Who or what keeps you inspired and motivated in your work?

I am blessed to work with some wonderful colleagues who inspire me. I am also blessed to work in an environment which prizes learning, personal development, and the well-being of both staff and students.

I believe teachers are privileged to have the opportunity to work with so many kids and to touch so many lives. Unlocking students’ potential to engage with their world in an empowered way is certainly a motivation for me.

Educators that inspire me include: Sir Ken Robinson @SirKenRobinson, Christopher Emdin @chrisemdin ‏ ‏, and Angela Duckworth @angeladuckw ‏.

What do you see as some of the biggest rewards and challenges for people working in education today?

Where else do we get to engage with kids who are on the cusp of entering the adult world? There’s a reward in seeing students making their way in the world as healthy, happy and successful people.

So many challenges.

A key challenge for teachers is to engage with students in a meaningful way, to guide them positively in a world with so many voices competing for their attention. To engage them in authentic deep learning, to engender a love of learning, to be a voice of hope and reason is a world that can sometimes seem so foreboding.

I’d be remiss not to mention also the challenge posed by the fragile mental health of many of our students. We need to do what we can to protect and care for our students.

If you had the ability to make changes to the education system in Australia, what would you do?

So much to rant about and so little time.

In Queensland, I would love to separate the senior years of schooling from university selection processes.

I would love to see schools become concerned primarily about learning, rather than assessment. I would love to see educators, families, bureaucrats, and politicians fully understand that performance in assessment may not actually be an indicator of a person’s potential, ability, intelligence, or worth.

What role do you see EduTweetOz playing on the education scene in Australia and what are your hopes for the account this week?

Edutweetoz plays an important role in helping educators to connect and share. Twitter PLNs open our eyes to perspectives and experiences outside our own. It allows us to explore a diversity of opinion and voice… and hopefully Australia and the world (and our students) are all the better because of it.

I hope the account this week generates conversations, interactions and learning for teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome back to Damian Marley @asteroidproject

Please tell us a little about your background in education. Why did you decide to become involved in education? What are some of the roles you’ve had and what does your current role involve?

damianmarley

I’ve been teaching since mid-2005, after a decade working in retail. I changed careers after a lightbulb moment and a voice in my head that told me to teach. I’ve worked in a variety of Primary schools and year levels and I’ve been Principal of Warburton Primary School, a small school in the upper Yarra Valley, since 2014.

 

Who or what keeps you inspired and motivated in your work?

The kids keep me inspired and the motivation is to continually improve myself, to continually motivate my staff and to continually grow the school in every way possible.

What do you see as some of the biggest rewards and challenges for people working in education today?

This is a human role and the rewards come when the relationships grow, the faces smile and the brains expand. The challenges are immense and they centre around how best to best meet the needs of all our students.

If you had the ability to make changes to the education system in Australia, what would you do?

I would increase the targeted funding to Government schools, in order to get more people on the ground to push our kids further and higher. I would want to redress the primacy of school choice. Choice is very important, but it needs to be balanced by appropriate community-building measures.

What role do you see EduTweetOz playing on the education scene in Australia and what are your hopes for the account this week?

My hope is to share the adventures of a Principal this week. EduTweetOz brings educators together across the sectors. Or settings are varied but at the centre we all have students who need us.

Introducing Melissa Reily

melissariley

Please tell us a little about your background in education. Why did you decide to become involved in education? What are some of the roles you’ve had and what does your current role involve?
I didn’t always want to be a teacher. In fact, quite the opposite. I went to a pretty rough comprehensive high school, where both the teachers and facilities were not given the respect they deserved. I saw some pretty awful things and because of this I convinced myself that teaching was one profession I would never even consider.

I went to University unsure of where I would eventually end up, and fell in love with archaeology from the very first lecture. My love for the discipline didn’t falter until the day I graduated. As soon as I stepped into the real world, however, I was far less sure of myself. I graduated at a time when there were very few jobs in archaeology or heritage management in Australia, and I believed my prospects for employment were limited at best. As a graduate with First Class Honours who also won an academic prize for the original research in her thesis, perhaps I should have had a little more faith in myself. But I didn’t.

After a couple of years of trying some different jobs and professions, I turned to teaching. I started with my own private archaeology education program and consultancy, and then quite quickly moved into classroom teaching. I completed my Grad Dip Ed and haven’t looked back.

I am currently a teacher of History and an ICT Integrator at SCEGGS Darlinghurst. That is the perfect role for me because I am able to combine the two things that I absolutely love: things that are very, very old (Ancient History) and very, very new (technology). An odd combination, I’ll admit, but it works for me.

In the classroom, I feel like I am home. If anyone had told my twenty year old self that I would be where I am right now, I would have laughed openly. But my 42 year old self knows that I have ended up in exactly the place I should be.

Home.

Who or what keeps you inspired and motivated in your work?

All of the students I’m yet to teach. The thought of all of those lives that I have the opportunity to positively influence keeps me motivated to strive to be the best I can possibly be.

What do you see as some of the biggest rewards and challenges for people working in education today?

If only I had the answer to this question! Student success (and I don’t necessarily mean the success that is measured by marks or leagues tables) will always be the biggest reward in teaching. As for challenges, there are always so many from both in and outside the profession, and they are constantly in a state of flux. What I have noticed very starkly of late, perhaps because it is the beginning of the school year, and at this time there is always a veritable explosion of media articles regarding education and schools, are the number of “experts” offering their opinions on our profession and the ways in which it can be improved. These “experts” are rarely teachers, even though we are the ones at the cold face of education. The erosion of teacher authority in the higher debates on educational theory and practice poses a great challenge for teachers.

If you had the ability to make changes to the education system in Australia, what would you do?

Magic wand style? A single education system, managed by the state, generously funded and resourced to support the highest quality teaching and learning for students, irrespective of socio-economic status. In this system, I see the teaching profession as being highly respected, with salaries commensurate with the importance of our jobs.

Realistically? Better funding, governance and bureaucracy in education. Wait, that was meant to be realistic…

In all seriousness, our education system needs a major overhaul, not just of funding models but of everything, from the ground up. As it has been said many times before, our children are the future and our treatment of the way in which they are educated should be reflective of this gravity.

What role do you see EduTweetOz playing on the education scene in Australia and what are your hopes for the account this week?

I have been an avid social media user, particularly of Twitter for several years. I actually took from break from Twitter for a couple of years, and in the time that I was gone, there was a huge increase in the use of this platform for extending professional networks, sharing resources and teaching ideas, and engaging in robust debate on issues of education.

EduTweetOz plays a vital role in all three of these areas. Importantly, because of its ‘democratic’ curation, it has a variety of voices and perspectives prodding this debate along.

My hopes for the account this week is that I’ll bring my expertise and experience to the table, but leave my opinions in my personal Twitter accounts. To facilitate and moderate, but not to dictate. To this end, I’ll be posting the latest news and interesting media pieces throughout my days as curator, and to lead a discussion on something important each evening. No spoiler alerts though, you’ll have to tune in to check out the discussion.

To add something truly interesting in the mix this week; from Friday I’ll be participating in an archaeological dig in Tasmania, which is actually teacher Professional Learning as well. So I’ll be tweeting from the field and I’m sure I’ll have some truly funny stories to relay along the way!

Can’t wait to join you all on Sunday 🙂

Please welcome Matthew Beggs back to EdutweetOZ!

Please tell us a little about your background in education. Why did you decide to become involved in education? What are some of the roles you’ve had and what does your current role involve?

I actually realised this year that I’ve been teaching for ten years and I cannot believe how fast the time has gone. I entered education and teaching after completing a degree in media studies and attempting to make it as a writer for a period of time. Teaching was always something in my mind as a potential career and it was something recommended to me by others. I have been teaching at the current school where I work in the western suburbs of Melbourne for the past five years and am currently the Grade 5/6 team leader. The previous two years to this I was teaching 3/4 and then previous to that 1/2. This year is my first year as a team leader and it has definitely creates some challenges. At the same time it has created some wonderful opportunities to extend myself as a teacher that I do not think that I could have been able to do in previous years.

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Who or what keeps you inspired and motivated in your work?

I think every day I turn up to work there is always something exciting and inspiring. Whether it be the student who has the “a-ha moment” or the opportunity to undertake new and exciting experiences, there is always something to motivate and challenge me. I think the fact that this year I have moved to a year level that I have never taught before is something that has motivated me to take greater risks as a teacher, which ultimately has led to me being more motivated to deliver the best possible educational experience that I can for the students that I work with.

What do you see as some of the biggest rewards and challenges for people working in education today?

I think one of the greatest rewards in education is still that moment where you can see the lightbulb goes off. The moment that a student you are working with achieves something that you might of initially felt was impossible is always such a rewarding thing. The small moments can sometimes lead to moments that are much larger and I think these small moments can sometimes be forgotten with the amount of noise that we are exposed to. A challenge that I feel in education today is the fact there is so much noise for everyone to navigate. It is becoming increasingly hard to distinguish which voices should be listened to and which voices should be ignored and ultimately this has an impact on both teachers and students.

 

 

If you had the ability to make changes to the education system in Australia, what would you do?

I think there needs to be greater interaction between those who are training teachers and schools working at the coalface. I feel that there needs to more done from all parties involved to help prepare teachers for the realities for the workforce. If more is not done to help bridge the gap that exist between teaching rounds and the reality of the workforce, teachers will continue to burn out as the pressures on them continue to increase.

 

What role do you see EduTweetOz playing on the education scene in Australia and what are your hopes for the account this week?

One of the things that EduTweetOz does so well is it allows for different voices to be heard in a constructive manner.

 

I think it helps to keep myself grounded as a teacher as I am able to see an amazing array of different examples of phenomenal teaching. By allowing for more voices to be heard, we are ultimately helping to promote the collegiate nature that we all seem to strive for.

I think for myself this week it is another chance to connect with those within the educational community and find what ends up making us tick as teachers. I think we seem to talk a lot about what drives us within the classroom it is always nice to reflect on what drives us outside the classroom (also what helps keep us sane outside the classroom). I think by trying to help myself and others identify our passions and to connect with others who might inspire us to be better as teachers and aren’t we always learning anyway? This account is a wonderful reflection of the Australian educational community and I hope that I can be a small part of this.